Borderline Personality Disorder for Family and Friends

This is a link to an interesting site… bpdfamily.com

It offers practical and emotional support to loved ones / family members who are living with an individual who may have the symptoms, and/or a diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).
The comments regarding diagnosis of BPD sadly mirrors the judgment of some of my peers who fall into the category of clinicians hesitant to acknowledge / diagnose this particular personality disorder.
Working with clients who have BPD can be testing,however, the roots of the disorder and treatment plans are far from complicated thanks to the emergence of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy and Schema Therapy.  BPD does not have to be a life sentence and some  individuals can and do recover. Challenging historical perceptions of the disorder would go a long way to improving the lives of many individuals and their families.

Shame and mental health

Why is it that when we feel down we often take that one step further and blame ourselves for feeling like this in the first place? We know that this additional self-punishment doesn’t do anything to make us feel better, but it seems to be something innate to human beings. You certainly don’t see cats berating themselves!

So why the need to self-chastise? I fear there are many factors involved, some of which lie below;

  • Unrelenting standards – where empathy for others does not extend to ourselves. It’s OK for others to fail from time to time, but it is not acceptable for this to happen to me.
  • Comments from family and friends – if only the words ‘pull yourself together’ helped!
  • Social and cultural factors – pressures to appear happy and content seem to be everywhere don’t they…
  • Unhelpful comparisons to others – why should I feel so hard done by when there are people starving in the world?
  • Personality factors – I should be able to manage without the help of others, I must be the best I can be…

There are no doubt countless other deeply ingrained human traits that lead us to ruminate and self-loathe but all seem pretty unhelpful from where I am sitting.

So how about we give ourselves a break. We all need time to feel sorry for ourselves and although we may not be good at it, there are ways treat ourselves with a little more kindness.

  • Ask yourself; would I be so hard on a friend if they were standing in my shoes? No? Well why the double standard?
  • If others close by don’t understand, could you reach out to someone who will? Often speaking to a stranger can be helpful. This might be a therapist / counselor or a Samaritan (tel. 08457 90 90 90). There is support available and it is surprising how much of a relief it can be to get things off your chest without judgment.
  • Cut out the shoulds and musts. Not only are they unhelpful, but they are unrealistic. We don’t live in a perfect world so why expect perfection from yourself?
  • Stop comparing yourself to others. It is not what happens to us in life that defines our happiness but the beliefs we have about these events. Some of the happiest people in the world do not strive for 10 out of 10. 8 or 9 is fine for them and good enough is good enough.